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C50_img_2742_1504803287 mcarlisle Quote
1/11/2017 7:54 PM

I'm considering buying a new (2016 or 2017) 250f in the spring. I grew up racing from 8yo until 16yo, and recently started riding again on a yz125. The 125 is a blast and will probably always keep it around for when I get the urge but I want something modern. I would say at the moment I'm probably a good C class rider. I'm also 29yo now so I'm just in it for fun and not out there putting in Motos trying to get lap times down. So with that said, I've only ever ridden 2 strokes, so from those of you that have ridden both for a period of time, what are some things I would initially notice different once I jump on the 4 stroke? Is there a big difference? Anything that is going to be annoying getting used to? Really just curious what you all think.

C50 DFWracefan Quote
1/11/2017 8:17 PM

Best I can explain is a two stroke likes to be kept wound up. A four stroke will pull from the bottom and has a linear power curve. Four strokes tend to have more of a drag brake effect when you let off the gas. I enjoy riding both even though I am not a good rider at all.

C50_img_8138_1507937792 731chopper Quote
1/11/2017 8:35 PM

Modern four strokes have a lot of power with much more linear delivery compared to a two stroke. They track better on hard pack and are more stable to jump as well. They jump differently than a two stroke which is one thing I notice quite a bit when switching back and forth. To me, a four stroke needs to accelerate hard off the face where as you need to chop the throttle more with a two stroke. Two strokes coast a lot better in the turns so you can ride them more fluidly in the corners where as with a four stroke you get more drag from the engine. Two strokes corner more easily but the four stroke's power delivery allows you to get away with poor line selection and form more.

C50_14956417_1185083941580125_8728825518097334358_n_1484087406 gpnewhouse Quote
1/11/2017 9:03 PM

I have a CRF 450 and a CR 250 and I swap about between them all the time, when the weathers good and the tracks dry and smooth there is nothing as fun as the two strokes but once the track gets rutted and wet the fourstrokes really shine through. The CRF just sorts itself out somehow and you end up riding out of things that you know would of put on the ground with the two stroke.

That being said, you do need to try a bike before you buy it. Fourstrokes seem to really exaggerate any flaws in the chassis unlike two strokes, by that I mean I love riding my mates 14 250sx but when I bought a 13 250sxf I couldn't stand the thing, used to just want to stand up every time you gave it throttle when turning. RMZ's handle brilliantly and my 16 CRF does but you should definitely find someone with whatever bike you're fancying before you buy one.

Other than that good luck finding yourself a nice bike, there are some good deals to be had if you search hard enough.

C50_engine.f_1455853935 BobPA Quote
1/11/2017 9:09 PM

You want a tree fiddy

Jason Anderson FTW

C50_img_2742_1504803287 mcarlisle Quote
1/12/2017 6:13 AM

I have heard about the engine braking with a four stroke and was wondering how that might affect you on a jump. My 125 is nice bc I can just move it around under me very easily for example scrubbing. I would imagine that would not be so easy with a heavy 4 stroke. Also just comparing a yz250f to my yz125 it looks like the bars would sit a little lower and further back in your lap. Is that common with more modern bikes? Cool insight so far gents. I appreciate it.

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