Sidi Atojo SRS Boots

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Tested: Sidi Atojo SRS Boot

An all-new premier level boot from Italy, designed to be lighter and more grippy on the bike.

Rating: Vital Review
The Good:

More ankle protection, great bike grip, lighter, still flexible, better for wider feet

The Bad:

Less replaceable parts, try on before you buy.

Overall Review:

In 2017, Sidi introduced the Crossfire 3, the third iteration of the top-of-the-line Crossfire motocross and off-road boots that the Italian company offered. Three years later, we now have the all-new Sidi Atojo SRS boot, which is not another version of the Crossfire, but a new-from-the-ground up motocross boot. When I asked Sidi if the Atojo was replacing the Crossfire 3 in their lineup, they said no, it is just another high-end offering.

First, let’s talk about the weird name real quick. It isn’t a made-up, nonsensical moniker or some Italian mythical creature. It is named after three Sidi-sponsored racers who all helped develop the boot. The “A” is for Alessandro Lupino, the “TO” is for Tony Cairoli, and the “JO” is for Jorge Prado. I’m just glad it isn’t called the LuCaiPra.

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Features of the Sidi Atojo SRS (from Sidi)

  • Technomicro microfiber upper and PU protections 
  • Lined with air Teflon mesh and cambrelle
  • Micro-adjustable and replaceable buckle system
  • Toe entirely wrapped in plastic protection with geometric design
  • Replaceable metatarsus protection
  • Anatomically shaped PU heel
  • 3 hyperextension systems (in the front, in the back of the boot and under the ankle)
  • PU bootleg on the back
  • Inner PU bootleg
  • Anatomically shaped PU shin plate
  • 3-buckle closure
  • Upper velcro closure
  • Elastic gaiter
  • Replaceable SRS sole
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First Impression

My first impression of these boots right out of the box was that they are light. Maybe it was the marketing material or wishful thinking, but I was hoping to see small numbers on the scales. A pair of the Atojos ways in at 3,728 grams (8.21 lbs.) which isn’t the lightest boots out there but on par with other high-end boot options. And for reference, they are a little less than a pound lighter than the Crossfire 3 boots (4,118 grams or 9.07 lbs. for the pair). 

Fit

Fit is one of the most important features of a motocross boot, just like any gear item. If the fit is off, it just doesn’t work. For years, pretty much every tester and average rider alike agreed that Sidi motocross boots have a narrow fit. Those riders with wide or even standard width feet could sometimes complain about hot-spots on the edges of there feet. Personally, I found the Crossfire 3 with the SRS soles (non-stiched) to be a tiny bit narrow in the past, but recently riding in them back to back with the Atojos, I find the Crossfires to fit me really well. Maybe my feet shrunk or my preference for tighter boots has increased. 

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That being said, the Sidi Atojo is not a narrow fitting boot. Nope, not even a little bit. I’m a size 10 in MX boots (10 or 10.5 in casual shoes depending on the brand) and so that is what I requested from Sidi. What I actually got was a 10.2 size. That is not a typo, the Sidi Atojo boot in european 44 is labeled 10.2 US. I’m not sure how the other boot sizes will be converted into US since I only had the one pair. 

But getting back to fit, they are definitely more generous in the toe box and lower foot section of the boot. The fit of the ankle and calf seem to be about the same, which is on the snug side. For riders that have Sidis now and are happy with the fit, you might want to size down. There is very limited media product available so I could only try the 10.2, but in the future, I plan to try the next size down. If you’ve tried Sidis in the past and found them too narrow, you might be in luck with the Atojos. 

Buckles/Straps

Previously, the Crossfire 3s and 2s had sort of a two-piece upper design where the hard plastic sections where the straps are anchored is closed over a separate leather section that is velcroed closed first. I was never a fan of this but I think it was necessary for the high amount of replaceable parts on the Crossfire boots. 

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Conversely, the Atojo has a more conventional one-piece upper where the shin plate and leather are together, much like other motocross boots. This, along with only three straps, makes putting on the boot twice as fast and way less clunky. I also feel like I can get a more secure and comfortable fit with the new, three-strap design. The downside to this is that, unlike the Crossfires, the upper plastic pieces are not replaceable. If you are “that guy” with ten-year-old Sidis replacing pieces as they fall apart, these aren’t going to work for you. 

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Yet, as always, the buckles and straps are replaceable and are of the same Sidi design and quality featured on there other boots. There is a new front “lockout” strap that secures to the shin plate and hooks under the two lower straps to prevent too much ankle extension. It looks to be replaceable, and removable for that matter, but I didn’t find it limiting my range of motion on the bike. 

Sole

Unlike the new upper pieces, the sole is the same as the Crossfire 3s. That is, the majority of the sole is replaceable with a screwdriver from home. There are small sections at the toe and heel of the boot that aren’t replaceable. Not only did I wear the Atojo and the Crossfire 3s on the same day to better feel the difference, but I also wore a pair of Fox Instincts as well, which is one of my favorite boots. Switching from Sidi to Fox made it crystal clear that Sidi soles are very stiff and supportive. And it highlighted how Fox’s soles are pretty soft. The plus side to the Atojo’s stiff sole is that it offers a boatload of protection and support and feels practically bombproof. The downside is you lose a little peg/control feel. Grip on the pegs is very good as well. 

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Flexibility

Some riding complained that the Crossfire 3s were too flexible, that there wasn’t enough ankle support. I wouldn’t go that far, but I would say that they offered more ankle movement than say a Tech 10. But, the new Atojo is much more solid in the ankle area with this much more substantial ankle hinge system. It doesn’t feel bulky on the bike, just solid in the ankle area, which I really like. 

Plus, the Atojo doesn’t sacrifice movement for that solid feeling. Flexing and extending my ankle is super easy and doesn’t take much break-in at all. After my first day of riding, the boots were ready to go. 

Bike Grip

With large rubber sections on the inside of the ankle hinge and the upper section, it is clear that Sidi made bike grip a priority for the Atojos. And I do notice more grip than the Crossfires on the bikes. More grip means more control and I found that I didn’t have to use as much squeezing force to hold the bike with my ankles. 

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Final Word

My only issue with the new Atojo is the sizing, but that is different for each rider and I could fit into the next size down perfectly. Overall, I think the Atojo might be more of true motocross boot than the Crossfires, which have always had a pretty intense off-road following. The solid ankle protection and sole should give any rider the armor they need for the track, the loss of a few grams is always helpful, the replaceable sole and a few other sections is classic Sidi, and the fit is now wider for those who found Sidis too narrow. The next question is, do you actually need some new boots or just an excuse to tell the significant other? 


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Specifications
Product Sidi Atojo SRS Boots
Type Men
Construction
Colors
Size 7 - 12.5
Miscellaneous TECHNOMICRO MICROFIBER UPPER AND PU PROTECTIONS

LINED WITH AIR TEFLON MESH AND CAMBRELLE

MICRO ADJUSTABLE AND REPLACEABLE BUCKLE SYSTEM

TOE ENTIRELY WRAPPED IN PLASTIC PROTECTION WITH GEOMETRIC DESIGN

REPLACEABLE METATARSUS PROTECTION

ANATOMICALLY SHAPED PU HEEL

3 HYPEREXTENSION SYSTEMS (IN THE FRONT, IN THE BACK OF THE BOOT AND UNDER THE ANKLE)

PU BOOTLEG ON THE BACK

INNER PU BOOTLEG

ANATOMICALLY SHAPED PU SHIN PLATE

3-BUCKLES CLOSURE

UPPER VELCRO CLOSURE

ELASTIC GAITER

REPLACEABLE SRS SOLE
Price $524.99
More Info

www.motonation.com

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